agosto 2012



Echoes from the Vault

“I touched down late last night at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport in what is probably the furthest east in Europe that I’ve been … I’m here to witness over 4,000 librarians from across the globe gather together for a week of hard-nosed professional development.”

I touched down late last night at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport in what is probably the furthest east in Europe that I’ve been.

Am I on holiday having just decided to hack my department’s blog for my own travel journal?

Nope.

I’m here to witness over 4,000 librarians from across the globe gather together for a week of hard-nosed professional development. I am attending the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions‘ annual World Library and Information Congress.This week I’ll get a chance to hear papers and discussions from librarians from countries as far removed as America and Singapore, and from disciplines as diverse as public children’s librarianship…

Ver la entrada original 361 palabras más


Echoes from the Vault

Pasilia, Helsinki, Finland. These first two days at the grand pow-wow of the world’s leading librarians has been intense and great, and has also come with a small learning curve. Yesterday, 11 August 2012, was the first day of the congress, although still technically a pre-conference day (unbeknownst to me). All of the sessions that looked interesting title-wise (Rare Books & Manuscripts, Cataloguing, etc. etc.) were followed by the initials “SC” in the congress booklet (referred to locally as “the WLIC Bible”). Upon entering my first session on cataloguing at 09:30 yesterday morning, I realized that “SC” meant “Standing Committee” and that the session was open to witnesses of the meeting of different IFLA section meetings. This was, at first, a bit jarring, as I had come prepared to listen to papers on policy or strategy, and instead I got to witness decision making in action. I quickly realized…

Ver la entrada original 495 palabras más


Echoes from the Vault

The term “calotype” is from the Greek kalos meaning beautiful. It is the name given to Fox Talbot‘s negative process. The name is often mistakenly applied to photographic “salted paper” prints (positives) which have been made from calotype negatives and as such the term calotype often requires disambiguation when conducting photographic research. In short, a calotype is a negative which is created in a camera, and a salted paper print is the positive print which can be reproduced many times over from the original negative.

The advent of this process brought with it a few key changes to Fox Talbot’s process. Firstly, the negative was not printed out using the action of the sun (as was the case for the photogenic drawing) but rather “developed” out using a chemical developer. This change was a symptom of a profound discovery which was that of the “latent…

Ver la entrada original 193 palabras más


The WordPress.com Blog

We’ve just released two improvements that will make WordPress.com even more efficient for you, leaving you more time to create content.

Site Stats

If you get a lot of traffic to your blog, your stats were sometimes slow to load.  We know you like to look at your stats often, think about how all those seconds added up.  Now, your main stats page loads all of its data in parallel:

This loads your whole stats page two to three times faster, which means less time spent staring at a spinner and more time for interacting with your readers and creating content.

Of course, if you’re a Jetpack user, you can partake in the speedy stats goodness on your WordPress.com stats page as well!

Toolbar Notifications

We’ve made your Toolbar Notifications faster to interact with also. Now you can navigate the Notifications menu from your keyboard.

Keys:

  • n : Open/Close the…

Ver la entrada original 62 palabras más


Echoes from the Vault

The National Library of Finland (from Wikimedia Commons).[/caption]

On Monday, 13 August 2012, IFLA’s Rare Book and Manuscript Sectionhosted a special topic day during the WLIC2012 event. This was a full-day conference held off of the WLIC site at the National Library of Finland. This library sits at the heart of downtown Helsinki and is a beautiful example of 19th century Empire architecture, blending nicely into the surrounding square. The conference included a tour of the library’s main rooms as well as a guided tour of the current exhibitions on offer by our kind host Sirkka Havu, Rare Books Librarian at the National Library of Finland. The conference took place in one of the educational rooms of the library, normally providing around 50 seats, however the day was so popular that at its height there were close to 80 observers crammed into the room…

Ver la entrada original 1.181 palabras más